Partners for Family Impact

What if all the social service agencies in our community would collaborate to serve fatherless children and single parents from one location

Photo of Kevin Karlson
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Founding Story: Share a story about a key experience or spark that helps the network understand why this project got started or a story about how you became inspired about the potential for this project to succeed.

Katie is 7, the oldest of 3 children. Mom has been in and out of jail and rehab because of issues with drugs, and dad abandoned mom and the kids years ago. Mom is now straight, working, going to college, and living with her parents with the kids while she gets back on her feet. Mom was aided immensely by a NPO serving homeless moms and kids but mom still had to deal with multiple and conflicting NPOs and government agencies to get food, shelter, financial, health, and educational services.

Which categories describe you? (the answer will not be public)

  • White (for example: German, Irish, English, Italian, Polish, French, Caucasian)

Website

http://www.pfinetwork.org

Location: Where is your organization headquartered? [State]

  • Texas

Location: Where is your project primarily creating impact? [City]

Collin and Denton County Texas first; the goal is to develop and prove a working model of collaboration that could be shared world wide.

Problem: What problem is this project trying to address?

Single parents and their fatherless children are frequently economically disadvantaged; many live in poverty. Fatherless kids are at the root of most of our most significant social problems: juvenile delinquency, underachievement, dropouts, drug abuse, adolescent pregnancy, and suicide. The best solution to the wounds of fatherlessness is a mentor; the research on outcomes is clear and compelling, but mentoring is no answer to family poverty.

Our Vision: Help, hope, and healing for fatherless kids and single parents. Through a collaborative network of existing NPOs serving these families, we intend build a "one stop" family center to house the NPOs in one place to minimize the travel and time demands on the moms and kids seeking help.  We intend to promote and expand existing mentoring programs for both kids and moms to restore the kids and their families to health, self-sufficiency, and service to their communities. We are producing a reality TV show, "Children of Hope", as a way to raise national awareness and money to fund this project.

Is your model focused on any of the following traditionally underserved communities?

  • Low-income communities

Does your model work within any of the following sectors?

  • Childcare
  • Child and Family Services
  • Community Development and Empowerment
  • Criminal Justice
  • Education
  • Mental Health

Year Founded

2015

Project Stage

  • Start-Up (a pilot that has just started operating)

Example: Walk the network through a specific example of what happens when a person or group engages with your solution.

No stories yet; still building our network of NPOs through a free monthly leadership and development forum to build personal relationships as a first step to collaboration.

Impact: What was the impact of your work last year? Please also describe the projected future impact for the coming years.

Contact with 15 existing NPOs in the community; 2 invited presentations to Frisco Social Services and Housing Board grants workshop to encourage collaboration; social media engagement.

Organization Type

  • nonprofit/NGO/citizen sector

Annual Budget

  • $100k - $250k

Financial Sustainability Plan: What is your solution’s plan to ensure financial sustainability?

Ongoing promotion and solicitation through the reality TV show "Children of Hope", along with more traditional fund raising through local board members and donations.

Unique Value Proposition: How else is this problem being addressed? Are there other organizations working in the same field, and how does your project differ from these other approaches?

Producing a reality TV show to raise awareness and money for fatherless kids is unique to PFI. Our vision to fund existing NPOs to move into a centrally located family center with a comprehensive menu of services is unique as well.

Reflect on the Field and its Future: Stepping outside of your project, what do you see as the most important or promising shifts that can advance children’s wellbeing?

We can no longer afford to have hundreds of small inefficient NPOs duplicating overhead, facilities, and services while serving one small segment of a big population. Donors are encouraging strategic investment and collaboration to increase both scope of reach and efficiency- "tackling the whole problem at once" and getting to a systemic solution, not isolated but inspiring success stories. We can serve and restore the whole family-emotionally, physically, spiritually, financially, educationally-and provide a future generation of healthy adults who serve their communities.

Source: How did you hear about the Children’s Wellbeing Challenge? (the answer will not be public)

  • Email

Referral: If you discovered the Challenge thanks to an organization or person other than Ashoka, who was it? (the answer will not be public)

RWJF email

Evaluation results

4 evaluations so far

1. Relevance: Does this project seem to help children (ages 0 to 12 years) develop a strong sense of self, belonging, and purpose?

5 - Yes, this is great! The project lays out a strong, compelling case for how its model nurtures children’s wellbeing. - 0%

4 - It seems like a good fit, and the model talks explicitly about children’s wellbeing. - 75%

3 - I think so. The project seems related to children’s wellbeing, but the logic is vague. - 25%

2 - Not sure. The project doesn’t have much to do with wellbeing, or it doesn’t give enough information. - 0%

1 - Nope, this project definitely doesn’t fit the challenge brief (e.g., It doesn’t help kids younger than 12, isn’t in the U.S., etc.) - 0%

2. Innovation: Does this project tackle children’s wellbeing from a new angle?

5 - I loved this! The project describes a novel model that addresses important cultural or systemic barriers. - 0%

4 - This is pretty cool. The project is addressing an important problem in a new or compelling way. - 50%

3 - I feel like there’s something there, but I want more details about what makes it distinctive. - 25%

2 - It’s a good project, but I’ve seen others like it before. - 25%

1 - It was confusing or hard to tell what it made it different. - 0%

3. Social Impact: What is this project’s potential for creating positive social impact?

5 - Lots of potential. This project is achieving impressive results, and it’s growing quickly. It could absolutely inspire changes in the ways we approach caring for kids nationally, across sectors (e.g. childcare, healthcare, education). - 50%

4 - Pretty good potential. This project demonstrates significant positive impact so far, and it could scale regionally or nationally one day and fundamentally change how a system operates (e.g. childcare, healthcare, education). - 0%

3 - Budding potential. This project is creating local impact, but it would take a few adjustments before it could scale. - 25%

2 - Some potential. This project demonstrates some initial positive impact, but it would require major changes before it could scale. - 25%

1 - Limited potential. This project has great intentions, but it looks like it does not include key drivers of a shift towards children’s wellbeing. - 0%

4. Overall, how do you feel about this idea?

5 - This idea rocked my world. It’s awesome! - 0%

4 - This idea seems really exciting. With a little more polishing, it’d be among my favorites. - 0%

3 - I think the idea is great, but it needs some work before it moves onto the next round. - 25%

2 - I liked it fine but preferred others. - 25%

1 - It didn’t make my heart beat faster. Needs significant revisions. - 50%

5. Offer some feedback. Where should this participant spend some time revising?

DEFINING THE PROBLEM. Make sure to articulate the root causes or main barriers of the social issue your project addresses. (Founding Story, Problem, Solution). - 33.3%

CLARITY OF MODEL. Make sure to mention (a.) the beneficiary, b) the main activities, and c) how those activities drive social impact. Keep it streamlined! - 100%

MARKETPLACE. Make sure to research other players in this space and articulate how this project is different. I didn’t get a complete sense of how this project compares to others. - 0%

IMPACT POTENTIAL. Make sure to use specific numbers to describe what your project has achieved so far! And consider how you might scale the model or its insights, through partnerships, trainings, or franchising. - 66.7%

WRITING STYLE. Try to stay concise and make it vivid. Avoid jargon. - 33.3%

Nothing stands out! I thought it was great. - 0%

3 comments

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Photo of Nathan M McTague, CPCC, CPDPE
Team

I love this idea. I think there's real merit to putting these resources all together.

I agree with Brittany below about your founding story versus an example story. I also think you could make your proposal stronger if you include the information on your "2016 campaign pdf" right in your proposal, rather than relying on the judges to click on it and apply it appropriately. Some of it could go under your impact for this year, and some could go under plans for financing...

Good luck!

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